January 2009

 

The Big Cleanup Continues

photo

A track hoe operator removes ash from Swan Pond Road right after the Kingston ash spill.

In the past weeks, the ash spill and ongoing clean-up at Kingston Fossil Plant has been national news. Some 300 TVA employees and contractors and more than 115 pieces of heavy equipment are onsite, working around the clock. An in-depth root-cause analysis will be done, but for now, it’s impossible to know exactly how many months it will take to remove or contain the ash or how much it will cost.

The clean-up efforts include engineers, scientists, water and air specialists and community relations personnel from TVA, as well as the Roane County Emergency Management Agency, the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They will continue conducting independent water, air and soil testing for the long-term.

photo

Reflected in his vehicle’s side mirror, Ryan Hicks, an environmental specialist with the Center for Toxicology & Environmental Health LLC, monitors the air for particulate after the ash spill at Kingston. Since Dec. 28, Hicks and others have been performing hundreds of such readings every day in the Kingston area. Results of air monitoring, as well as water sampling, are available here.

“At TVA, we take seriously our mission of providing electricity, environmental stewardship and economic development to the Tennessee Valley region,” said Chief Executive Officer Tom Kilgore. “The beauty of this valley and its rivers are special to all of us at TVA. TVA’s environmental-restoration efforts will continue in earnest to restore this area as the land and rivers all of us know, care for and enjoy.

photo

Tom Kilgore shows Governor Phil Bredesen photos of the spill area.

“When this is all over, we’re going to be able to look our neighbors in the eye and say that TVA did the right thing.”

photo

Top: From left, civil engineer Gary Melton, project manager Harold Catlett and program manager Stuart Harris with TVA’s Coal Combustion Byproduct group go over drawings of the site to look for areas to place material released during the ash spill.

 

Below: From left, Bob Summers, who is in charge of Kingston cleanup, and Tim Hope, in charge of recovery, participate in a briefing.

photo