TVA Police Partner with Other Agencies to Protect and Serve

Individuals who commit crimes on TVA public lands or involving TVA assets rarely stay within a single jurisdiction. Their illegal actions can quickly involve federal, state and local officers, all tasked with upholding the law.

goodcops.jpg

Just ask TVA Police & Emergency Management Director Todd Peney. He said TVA’s police officers and Monitoring Notification Center employees—charged with protecting TVA’s employees and resources—often work with outside law enforcement agencies. 

He recently cited the increase in the number of exposed historic items after February’s record rainfall revealed previously hidden Native American artifacts throughout TVA’s 293,000 acres of public land and 11,000 miles of shoreline. 

“One of the responsibilities of TVA and TVA Police & Emergency Management is protection of Native American cultural heritage,” said Peney. “We work with area law enforcement agencies to safeguard and recover historic items taken from TVA-managed lands.”   

Because TVA is a vital part of our seven-state service region, TVA law enforcement officers and local, state and federal law enforcement agencies frequently team up on emergent situations, as well as routine investigations.

“The way we work together to protect artifacts is a good example of the partnerships we have with all nearby law enforcement agencies,” Peney said. “TVA Police & Emergency Management is a relatively small law enforcement agency for the size of the area we cover, but our partners in blue know that, by helping us, they also are helping their local communities because TVA has such a large influence on all the people they protect and serve.” 

TVA Police Law Enforcement Senior Manager Phillip Rickett agreed.

“The men and women of area law enforcement agencies are partners who uphold the law and keep everyone secure, regardless of jurisdiction,” Rickett said. “We all work together to provide assistance any time another agency calls.”

Recently, TVA Police & Emergency Management and the Chattanooga Office Complex hosted more than 50 representatives from local, state and federal agencies in and around the Chattanooga area. Their goal was to strengthen their bonds with others who are committed to upholding the law. This gathering, and events that TVA Police inspectors host throughout the Valley for local law-enforcement agency representatives, help ensure area agencies have some familiarity with TVA, the TVA facility in their jurisdiction and the importance of TVA to the region.  

Peney said such assemblies all help establish strong partnerships. “The time to form a relationship is before you need it,” he said. “Building a strong partnership with other law enforcement agencies is critical to TVA and our mission of service to the people of the Valley.”  

If You See Something, Say Something

If you see something suspicious, witness looting of an archaeological site or see someone using a metal detector on TVA lands, say something. Call TVA Police & Emergency Management toll-free at (855) 476-2489. Also, learn how you, your friends and your family members can help protect cultural resources on TVA public lands as part of the TVA public volunteer project A Thousand Eyes